ChineseBay

postheadericon Cantonese Input

There are many ways to input Chinese characters for Cantonese speakers.
Here you can find some online Cantonese input using Jyutping or English.

 

  1. http://cantoneseinput.com/ where you can input Chinese characters with Jyutping or English.  For example you can type by input “ghost”
  2. Jyutping input for Chinese characters at MDBG:   Type Chinese with Jyutping. http://www.mdbg.net/chindict/webime2.php?ime=jyutping_trad
  3. Even though Google doesn’t believe that Cantonese is a bigger language (60 million in 2007) than Dutch (about 23 millioin native speakers), they have a pretty good Cantonese input for Google Translate, which forces people to believe that Cantonese is just Chinese.   Google Translate’s wrong concept always lead to lots of funny Google traslation from Cantonese Chinese characters.
    For all those who want to urge Google to add Cantonese translate to their translate tool at http://translate.google.com, please yell: “Google, add Cantonese translation now!”

Google Cantonese Input

 

Here’s how you can input Chinese characters with Google Cantonese Input:  for example:

我冇錢    you’ll need to type: ngo mou chin  (actually,  when you type n and 1.(ngo) pops up as the 1st choice,  and you only need to press space to select it.  Then you can continue to type mo and you can see when you type just mo and you can select 3 for the character. Type chin for and you may select 1 for the character after you input ch.

Here’s a video to show you how good is the Cantonese input by Google:

For this Cantonese input tool, they did a good job.  However, we still want to urge Google:  Add Cantonese translation!

Related: I did introduce Google’s universal Cantonese input (not just at Google Translate) in early 2013.